Featuring live charts, price analysis, breaking news, currency converter and more. The only bitcoin app you need! rss Virginia 1,120 ZENS (0) E-mail: customerservice@simplyswitch.com Planet Earth GA Residential: 877-677-4355 AP Life Sciences Jump up ^ Bird, Winifred, "Powering Japan's future", Japan Times, 24 July 2011, p. 7. 13.5¢ Dictaphones Guides to Saving Money on Energy Moreover, Brienza's clients don't have to cope with the machine noise and the heat. That's about as long as I can hold my hand there. And then it starts to burn. Energy Education Released October 06, 2016 | tags: annualcommercialconsumption/demandcostselectricityfinancial markets+industrialmost popularpricesresidentialrevenuesalesstatestransportation Wikipedia store Pay Less For Power By Tracking Usage and Buying What You Need When You Need It Art Reviews Temperatures are rising, but your bill doesn't have to. Reduce your energy usage and save money this summer with our energy-saving tips! Kansas City Power and Light Company READ 10 REVIEWS Stay Connected 189adeb61d1ae5c290 MONTHLY FEE Cordless Angle Drills ECSS 24 Photo: Georgia Power Company Source Power and Gas Variable Rate Electricity Plans Allconnect® works with partners Choose Energy and Save on Energy to help you conveniently compare electricity providers. If you live in a deregulated electricity market, shopping around for the best rates and plans could help you reduce your monthly utility bill. Compare offers from electricity companies South Plains Electric Cooperative Submit Compare Gas and Electricity Prices 74741 Education » Restore content access for purchases made as guest Texas electric providers (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 18:38 EST-0500) salutation variable Understanding Rate Plans Payless Power Long-term TD&A costs per customer for investor owned utilities have remained remarkably constant over the past six decades. https://live-energy-institute.pantheonsite.io/sites/default/files/UTAustin_FCe_TDA_2016.pdfROBERT L. FARES, PHD 910.97 kWh Families putting down roots in areas such as Bellaire and Piney Point Village might look into longer energy plan term lengths. Consumers can browse Houston electricity plans that last for a few years. Cordell Eddings Customer Commitments Jump to navigationJump to search Fixed vs variable rate plans hydropower 74775 Escambia River Electric Cooperative Dallas Optislim Weight Loss Shakes Home | View Full Site | Feedback| Privacy You must be good at math, analysis and forecasting. But the system's complexity flabbergasts even ultra-careful consumers. Clamps At 45,000 MWd/t burn-up this gives 360,000 kWh electrical per kg, hence fuel cost = 0.39 ¢/kWh.Fuel costs are one area of steadily increasing efficiency and cost reduction. For instance, in Spain the cost of nuclear electricity was reduced by 29% over the period 1995-2001. Cost reductions of 40% were achieved by boosting enrichment levels and burn-up. Prospectively, a further 8% increase in burn-up will give another 5% reduction in fuel cost.Uranium has the advantage of being a highly concentrated source of energy which is easily and cheaply transportable. The quantities needed are very much less than for coal or oil. One kilogram of natural uranium will yield about 20,000 times as much energy as the same amount of coal. It is therefore intrinsically a very portable and tradeable commodity.The contribution of fuel to the overall cost of the electricity produced is relatively small, so even a large fuel price escalation will have relatively little effect (see below). Uranium is abundant and widely available.There are other possible savings. For example, if used fuel is reprocessed and the recovered plutonium and uranium is used in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, more energy can be extracted. The costs of achieving this are large, but are offset by MOX fuel not needing enrichment and particularly by the smaller amount of high-level wastes produced at the end. Seven UO2 fuel assemblies give rise to one MOX assembly plus some vitrified high-level waste, resulting in only about 35% of the volume, mass and cost of disposal.This 'back-end' of the fuel cycle, including used fuel storage or disposal in a waste repository, contributes up to 10% of the overall costs per kWh, or less if there is direct disposal of used fuel rather than reprocessing. The $26 billion US used fuel program is funded by a 0.1 cent/kWh levy.Operation and maintenance (O&M) costs account for about 66% of the total operating cost. O&M may be divided into ‘fixed costs’, which are incurred whether or not the plant is generating electricity, and ‘variable costs’, which vary in relation to the output. Normally these costs are expressed relative to a unit of electricity (for example, cents per kilowatt hour) to allow a consistent comparison with other energy technologies.Decommissioning costs are about 9-15% of the initial capital cost of a nuclear power plant. But when discounted over the lifetime of the plant, they contribute only a few percent to the investment cost and even less to the generation cost. In the USA they account for 0.1-0.2 cent/kWh, which is no more than 5% of the cost of the electricity produced.External costsExternal costs are not included in the building and operation of any power plant, and are not paid by the electricity consumer, but by the community generally. The external costs are defined as those actually incurred in relation to health and the environment, and which are quantifiable but not built into the cost of the electricity.The European Commission launched a project, ExternE, in 1991 in collaboration with the US Department of Energy – the first research project of its kind "to put plausible financial figures against damage resulting from different forms of electricity production for the entire EU". The methodology considers emissions, dispersion and ultimate impact. With nuclear energy, the risk of accidents is factored in along with high estimates of radiological impacts from mine tailings (waste management and decommissioning being already within the cost to the consumer). Nuclear energy averages 0.4 euro cents/kWh, much the same as hydro; coal is over 4.0 c/kWh (4.1-7.3), gas ranges 1.3-2.3 c/kWh and only wind shows up better than nuclear, at 0.1-0.2 c/kWh average. NB these are the external costs only. If these costs were in fact included, the EU price of electricity from coal would double and that from gas would increase 30%. These are without attempting to include the external costs of global warming.A further study commissioned by the European Commission in 2014, and carried out by the Ecofys consultancy, calculated external costs for nuclear as €18-22/MWh, including about €5/MWh for health impacts, €4/MWh for accidents and €12/MWh for so-called ‘resource depletion’, relating to the “costs to society of consumption of finite fuel resources now, rather than in the future”. Although Ecofys acknowledges that the resource depletion cost is difficult to calculate since the scarcity of a finite natural resource is already reflected in its market price, and could therefore just as well be zero, a high estimate was asserted using a questionable methodology and without taking account of the potential for recycling nuclear fuel.Another report for the European Commission made by Professor William D’haeseleer, University of Leuven, in November 2013, estimated the cost of a potential nuclear accident to be in the range of €0.3-3/MWh.Pricing of external benefits is limited at present. As fossil fuel generators begin to incur real costs associated with their impact on the climate, through carbon taxes or emissions trading regimes, the competitiveness of new nuclear plants will improve. This is particularly so where the comparison is being made with coal-fired plants, but it also applies, to a lesser extent, to gas-fired equivalents.The likely extent of charges for carbon emissions has become an important factor in the economic evaluation of new nuclear plants, particularly in the EU where an emissions trading regime has been introduced but which is yet to reflect the true costs of carbon emissions. Prices have stayed relatively low within the national and sub-national jurisdictions that currently put a price on carbon emissions. In Europe, since 2013, the European Union Allowance price is stagnating around €5-9/tCO2. The European Union is considering a reform to the Emissions Trading System to ensure more stable and higher permit prices needed to support the delivery of its 1990-2030 greenhouse gas emissions reduction target of 40%.An analysis by the Brattle Group in 2016 showed that zero-emission credits for nuclear power could secure the economic viability of nuclear plants in competition with subsidised renewables and low-cost gas-fired plants. It said: "A typical revenue deficit for a vulnerable nuclear power plant is around $10/MWh," which is equivalent to costing "the avoided CO2 emissions... between $12 and $20 per ton of CO2, varying with the regional fossil fuel mix that would substitute for the plant." It said: "This cost compares favorably with other carbon abatement options such as state policies designed to reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector, as well as with many estimates of the social cost of carbon."“These findings demonstrate that the retention of existing nuclear generating plants, even at a modest operating cost recovery premium for a limited period, represents a cost-effective method to avoid CO2 emissions in the near term and would enable compliance with any future climate policy at a reasonable cost. Sustaining nuclear viability in the interim is a reasonable and cost-effective insurance policy in the longer term.”Under New York's Clean Energy Standard (CES), zero-emission credits (ZEC) will be implemented in six tranches over a period of 12 years starting April 2017. For the first two-year period nuclear generators will receive ZECs of $17.54/MWh, paid by the distribution utilities (and hence eventually ratepayers) but otherwise similar to the federal production tax credits applying to renewables since 1993 on an inflation-adjusted basis, though at a lower rate than its $23/MWh for wind. ZECs would escalate to $29.15/MWh over subsequent years.The NY Public Service Commission on 1 August 2016 approved the Clean Energy Standard. The majority vote was reported to be on three main criteria: grid reliability, reducing carbon emissions, and maintaining jobs. The governor’s announcement stated: “A growing number of climate scientists have warned that if these nuclear plants were to abruptly close, carbon emissions in New York will increase by more than 31 million metric tons during the next two years, resulting in public health and other societal costs of at least $1.4 billion.”In Illinois, in December 2016 the Future Energy Jobs Bill was passed, with a core feature being the establishment of the Zero Emission Standard (ZES) to preserve the state’s at-risk nuclear plants, saving 4,200 jobs, retaining $1.2 billion of economic activity annually and avoiding increases in energy costs. The bill provided ZECs similar to those in New York – "a tradable credit that represents the environmental attributes of one megawatt hour of energy produced from a zero emission facility" (such as the nuclear power plants which supply about 90% of the state’s zero-carbon electricity). It will provide up to $235 million annually to support two plants – 2,884 MWe net capacity – for ten years.Other costsIn order to provide reliable electricity supply, provision must be made for backup generation at times when the generating plant is not operating. Provision must also be made to transmit the electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. The costs incurred in providing backup and transmission/distribution facilities are known as system costs.System costs are external to the building and operation of any power plant, but must be paid by the electricity consumer, usually as part of the transmission and distribution cost. From a government policy point of view they are just as significant as the actual generation cost, but are seldom factored into comparisons of different supply options, especially comparing base-load with dispersed variable renewables. In fact the total system cost should be analysed when introducing new power generating capacity on the grid. Any new power plant likely requires changes to the grid, and hence incurs a significant cost for power supply that must be accounted for. But this cost for large base-load plants is usually small compared with integrating variable renewables to the grid.For nuclear and fossil fuel generators, system costs relate mainly to the need for reserve capacity to cover periodic outages, whether planned or unplanned. The system costs associated with renewable generation relate to their inability to generate electricity without the required weather conditions and their generally dispersed locations distant from centres of demand.The integration of intermittent renewable supply on a preferential basis despite higher unit cost creates significant diseconomies for dispatchable supply, as is now becoming evident in Germany, Austria and Spain, compromising security of supply and escalating costs. At 40% share of electricity being from renewables, the capital cost component of power from conventional thermal generation sources increases substantially as their capacity factor decreases – the utilisation effect. This has devastated the economics of some gas-fired plants in Germany, for instance.In some countries, market design results in a market failure wherby reliable (and low carbon), but capital-intensive technologies (such as large hydro and nuclear) cannot be financed because long-term power purchase contracts are not available, meaning there is no certainty that investments can be recouped. Long-term electricity storage solutions (when/if the technology becomes available) face the same financing problem because these will also be capital-intensive.The overall cost competitiveness of nuclear, as measured on a levelised basis (see figure below on Comparative LCOEs and System Costs in Four Countries), is much enhanced by its modest system costs. However, the impact of intermittent electricity supply on wholesale markets has a profound effect on the economics of base-load generators, including nuclear, that is not captured in the levelised cost comparisons given by the International Energy Agency (IEA) - Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) reports. The negligible marginal operating costs of wind and solar mean that, when climatic conditions allow generation from these sources, they undercut all other electricity producers. At high levels of renewable generation, for example as implied by the EU’s 30% renewable penetration target, the nuclear capacity factor is reduced and the volatility of wholesale prices greatly increases whilst the average wholesale price level falls. The increased penetration of intermittent renewables thereby greatly reduces the financial viability of nuclear generation in wholesale markets where intermittent renewable energy capacity is significant. See also Electricity markets section below.An OECD study (OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (2012), Nuclear Energy and Renewables: System Effects in Low-carbon Electricity Systems) found that the integration of large shares of intermittent renewable electricity is a major challenge for the electricity systems of OECD countries and for dispatchable generators such as nuclear. Grid-level system costs for variable renewables are large ($15-80/MWh) but depend on country, context and technology (onshore wind < offshore wind < solar PV). Nuclear system costs are $1-3/MWh.See also paper on Electricity Transmission Grids.Nuclear-specific taxes are levied in several EU countries. In 2014 Belgium raised some €479 million from a €0.005/kWh tax. In July 2015, Electrabel agreed to pay €130 million tax for the year 2016, alongside a fee for life extension of Doel 1&2 (€20 million/yr). From 2017 onwards, a formula will apply for calculating tax contributions, with a minimum of €150 million per year.In 2000 Sweden introduced a nuclear-specific tax on installed capacity, which gradually increased over time; in 2015, the tax raised about €435 million. In June 2016 the Swedish government, amid growing concerns over the continued viability of existing plants, agreed to phase out the tax on nuclear power from 2017 onwards.In Germany, a tax was levied on nuclear fuel that required companies to pay per gram of fuel used over six years to 2016. After various court rulings, in June 2017 the Federal Constitutional Court finally ruled that the nuclear fuel tax was “formally unconstitutional and void,” which meant that the three major utilities could be reimbursed some €6.3 billion paid between 2011 and 2016 – €2.8 billion by E.On, €1.7 billion by RWE and €1.44 billion by EnBW, plus interest.The UK exercises a Climate Change Levy, which continues to 2023. It is a downstream tax on energy delivered to non-domestic users in the UK introduced in 2001. Initially levied against fossil fuels and nuclear, the government removed renewables' exemption in its July 2015 Budget. In 2011 the government introduced a carbon floor price – a mechanism that has long been seen as fundamental to the economics of new UK nuclear power. The government set a minimum of £16 per tonne CO2 from 2013, rising steadily to £30 per tonne in 2020, and £70 per tonne in 2030.See also paper on Energy subsidies and external costs.Electricity marketsThe economics of any power generation depends primarily on what each unit (kWh, MWh) costs to produce and get to the consumer who creates the demand for that power. This is the LCOE as outlined above. But secondly it depends on the market into which the power is sold, where the producer and grid operator run into a raft of government policies often coupled with subsidies for other sources. Such policies raise the question of what public good is served by each, and whether overall the public good is optimised. Where the outcome is not maximising public good effectively, there is market failure.** This section draws heavily on the Nuclear Economics Consulting Group webpage on Market Failure.A market can work well to achieve its stated objectives, but still result in market failure. This is often explained by externalities – negative or positive impacts of an industry – that are not reflected in the market. With electricity, the direct (private) costs of generating power do not usually include the external costs (e.g. emissions, system costs due to intermittent operation, land use, noise) nor do they account for the benefits of positive externalities (e.g. knock-on economic activity from jobs, system reliability, fuel diversity).Electricity markets rely on direct or private costs to dispatch (i.e. turn on and turn off) generators to meet varying real-time demand for power. Those costs determine merit order of dispatch. Meeting real-time electricity demand is a difficult and challenging process. The electricity markets do this, but do not reflect the externalities of the generators participating in the market and may result in market failure. An electricity market with efficient short-term spot prices should not be expected to achieve other objectives such as lower emissions, long-term system reliability, or implementation of national policy.Merchant generating plants rely on selling power into a commodity market which is shaped by policies including those which may favour particular sources of power regardless of their immediate and longer-term deficiencies in relation to the public good. (Generating plants in a regulated or government-owned electricity industry can deliver power essentially on a cost-plus basis, with regulators or governments able to reflect externalities in decisions.) Nuclear power plants provide a range of benefits to society that are not compensated in the commodity electricity market revenue stream. These public benefits include emission-free electricity, long-term reliable operation, system stability, system fuel diversity and fuel price hedging, as well as economic benefits from employment.Generic approaches to fix market failure include imposing costs on negative externalities such as CO2 emissions, providing compensation to support positive externalities, and government ownership of sectors likely to experience market failure. Some US states make zero emission credit (ZEC) payments to nuclear generation to reward the positive externalities. ZECs are similar to the production tax credits applying to wind power, though lower, but are based directly on estimated emission benefits. They mean that the value of nuclear electricity can be greater than the LCOE cost of producing it in markets strongly influenced by low gas prices and subsidies on variable wind generation which has market priority. Without the ZEC payments, nuclear operation may not be viable in this situation.Comparing the economics of different forms of electricity generationIn 2017 the US EIA published figures for the average levelised costs per unit of output (LCOE) for generating technologies to be brought online in 2022, as modelled for its Annual Energy Outlook. These show: advanced nuclear, 9.9 c/kWh; natural gas, 5.7-10.9 c/kWh (depending on technology); and coal with 90% carbon sequestration, 12.3 c/kWh (rising to 14 c/kWh at 30%). Among the non-dispatchable technologies, LCOE estimates vary widely: wind onshore, 5.2 c/kWh; solar PV, 6.7 c/kWh; offshore wind, 14.6 c/kWh; and solar thermal, 18.4 c/kWh.The 2015 edition of the OECD study on Projected Costs of Generating Electricity showed that the range for the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) varied much more for nuclear than coal or CCGT with different discount rates, due to it being capital-intensive. The nuclear LCOE is largely driven by capital costs. At 3% discount rate, nuclear was substantially cheaper than the alternatives in all countries, at 7% it was comparable with coal and still cheaper than CCGT, at 10% it was comparable with both. At low discount rates it was much cheaper than wind and PV. Based on a 0% discount rate, LCOE for nuclear soared to three times as much as the 10% discount rate, while that for coal was 1.4 times and for CCGT it changed very little. Solar PV increased 2.25 times and onshore wind nearly twice at 10% discount rate, albeit with very different capacity factors to the 85% for the three base-load options. For all technologies, a $30 per tonne carbon price was included. LCOE figures omit system costs.Comparative LCOEs and system costs in four countries (2014 and 2012)** LCOE plant costs have been taken from Projected Costs of Generating Electricity 2015 Edition. System costs have been taken from Nuclear Energy and Renewables (NEA, 2012). A 30% generation penetration level for onshore wind, offshore wind and solar PV has been assumed in the NEA estimates of system costs, which include back-up costs, balancing costs, grid connection, extension and reinforcement costs. A discount rate of 7% is used throughout, which is therefore consistent with the plant level LCOE estimates given in the 2015 edition of Projected Costs of Generating Electricity. The 2015 study applies a $30/t CO2 price on fossil fuel use and uses 2013 US$ values and exchange rates.Projected nuclear LCOE costs for plants built 2015-2020, $/MWh Geothermal Hydrothermal 50 100 2011 Ethereum? Emera (Bangor Hydro) Not all plans are equal. Projected LCOE in the U.S. by 2022 (as of 2016) $/MWh Bounce Energy Fantastic Fixed 6 6 months $0.095 / kWh 77057 Movies & TV Site Policies - Sitemap - Texas Homeland Security - Ready.gov - Texas.gov - Texas Veterans - TRAIL - Website Support - Contact Us - Report Fraud, Waste or Abuse Power Outage Compare Energy plans Resources for Educators Charge Controller--An industrial model from Jade Mountain, rated for 16 amps (to provide room for adding more solar panels later), and cost only $62. Ward had to buy 2 fuse holders and 20 amp fuses, mount this controller on a home-made aluminum heat sink and build a cover himself....but for the price he'll be able to add 2 or 3 more solar panels without a new controller. Breaking News Alerts Small businesses BTV Seasonal Magazine (en français) LCOE data from the California Energy Commission report titled "Estimated Cost of New Renewable and Fossil Generation in California".[64] The model data was calculated for all three classes of developers: merchant, investor-owned utility (IOU), and publicly owned utility (POU). saving $300 a year on average.* Homebrew Wind Power Extra Energy Buy This Stuff Reduce Your Use University Battery Bank -- 4 Golf Cart Batteries Cheap Electricity Rates Virginia[edit] Here we are... So much to say with so much space to say it. I'm... or if you have your payment ID or account number Make A One Time Payment Arlington Dallas Humble Mesquite San Angelo That gave wind-farm owners a great incentive to lower their prices. The data show that the clearing price in the real-time market went from $17.40 per megawatt-hour for the interval ending 12:15 a.m., to zero for the interval ending 1:45 a.m. Then it went into negative territory and stayed at zero or less until about 8:15 a.m. For the interval ending 5:45 a.m., the real-time price of electricity in Texas was minus $8.52 per megawatt-hour. Minnesota Power Source: Texas Coalition for Affordable Power Share Tweet Send Texas' electricity marketplace riddled with deceiver, manipulators and violators Our FREE guide to woodburners Supplier Renewal & Options Notices EVs are cheapest to run in Louisiana ($367), followed by Washington ($372), Arkansas ($382), Idaho ($390), and Tennessee ($398). Hawaii ($1,106), Alaska ($833), Connecticut ($804), New Hampshire ($751), and Rhode Island ($737) have the highest electricity costs. Jaguar brings its cool XF Sportbrake station wagon to U.S. 7. Pick your poison. Deeper in the website you see a search box along the left side. Under “Plan Type,” a recommended pick is fixed, but you can also choose a variable or an indexed market rate. (The Watchdog likes fixed since market conditions can grow volatile.) Under “Price,” type in a range from 4 cents to 12 cents. That’s a good spread. Pick a contract length. Fill out the other boxes. Then hit “Refresh Results” on the bottom. Keep trying different combinations to see what the prices are that day. They change often. Flexible contracts 6 Further reading Published online: 24 May 2006 American Light & Power | PUCT 10147 Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Cyber, Intelligence and Security Division Looking for important Texas energy documents? Find them here. n : expected lifetime of system or power station Here are more stories that look at the news with empathy, insight, and hope. Population Flickr TOP Your Business tags: capacitygeneration RSS GET TIPS The final version calls for a 32% cut in carbon emissions from power plants by 2030. This is more drastic than the 30% cuts found in the draft released in 2014. 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